Useful Websites for Yearbook Advisers and Students

Magazines to read

Image by Longzero via Flickr

Websites Every Yearbook Adviser Should Know

My last few posts have been about apps for teachers, my favorite apps, going paperless, and the possibility of the yearbook as an ebook. So, instead of writing more about iPad apps,  I thought I would post a list of websites that I find useful in my role as a yearbook adviser since that is a huge part of my teaching life.  Some of these sites I use regularly, some occasionally. But, no matter the frequency I visit them, they have all helped me at some point or another.

I’ve broken the list into categories in order to give a better sense of where I go when looking for something applicable to a particular need. I’m sure this list is not definitive by any stretch of the imagination. If you know a useful website, let me know about it. Please.

Design Inspiration and Ideas

During my 12 years as a yearbook adviser I have found that I spend a lot of time looking for design ideas for spreads. When trying to find some ideas or inspiration, here are some websites I like to use and send my students to.

Various Publication Types

These are sites I mainly use to look for magazine spreads.

  1. The Society of Publication Designers A great site for looking at layouts from all types of publications. The site also has articles discussing various design topics.
  2. A board someone put together on Pinterest Pinterest is the latest hot, up-and-coming social site that lets it users “pin” images and pieces of websites they like into collections called boards which they organize by interest. I just recently found this board of images showcasing some really good spread designs. One thing to note about Pinterest is that you have to be invited to start your own boards.
  3. A Flickr group devoted to layouts There are several groups on Flickr devoted to layout design. This is just the one I happen to like the most.
  4. issuu.com  Issuu lets people and publishers post their magazines. You can look through and entire issue of the magazines listed on the site to look for design ideas or inspiration. One thing to be cautious about before sending staffers to the site is that some of the magazines may contain images that are inappropriate for your students.
  5. Google’s Image Search Sometimes I like to go  to Google’s Image search and use “flickr magazine layouts” or “great magazine layouts” just to see what pops up.

Yearbook Publishers Showcases

All of the big school yearbook publishers have sections to showcase some of the work in their clients’ books. Some of the sites also make it possible to view issues of the magazines they send to the advisers of their client school.

  1. Herff Jones’ Design Showcase This link will allow you to look at different layouts for some of Herff Jones’ schools.
  2. Walsworth’s Showcase You can look at covers, layouts, and award winners from Walsworth’s schools here.
  3. Josten’s Lookbook, Adviser & Staff Magazine Go here to look at the publications Josten’s makes available to the advisers at its client schools.
  4. Josten’s Yearbook Contests Josten’s runs one of the largest national yearbook contests and you can go here to look at the winners.
  5. Balfour/Taylor Publishing  You can look at the current issue of Taylor  Talk here.

Getting the Word Out and Sharing

I decided to include these sites on the list because of their ability to help yearbook advisers and staff stay connected with the students and parents at their school.

  1. Facebook You can create a page for your yearbook on Facebook. I have used our school’s yearbook page to give hints of spreads, share some photos, and, most importantly, post messages about ordering dates or other information.
  2. Twitter Another way to get important information out to students and parents is by setting up a Twitter account for the yearbook.
  3. Flickr  A popular site for sharing photos. You could set up an account for the yearbook and get students and parents to share their photos through this service.
  4. Picasa  This is Google’s photo sharing site; so, if you already have gmail, all you have to do is activate your Picasa option to start using this service.  The adviser for my school’s elementary yearbook uses photos parents submit through Picasa.

Journalism Associations and Organizations

The following websites are for national press associations and organizations related to high school journalism.  They all have tons of information about journalism, contests, workshops, and other general topics a yearbook adviser or journalism teacher will find helpful.  I tend to go to these sites when I am looking for lesson plan ideas, contest information, or critique services.

  1. Quill and Scroll Society
  2. National Scholastic Press Association
  3. Columbia Scholastic Press Association
  4.  Journalism Education Association
  5.  High School Journalism from ASNE

Well, there is the list such as it is.  If you use a website that you find useful as a yearbook adviser please let me know about it.

Can a School’s Yearbook Work as an EBook?

English: The iPad on a table in the Apple case

Image via Wikipedia

Apple Rumors and Revelations

Last week’s announcement from Apple about iBooks 2, textbooks, and iBooks Author immediately grabbed my attention. This was mainly because I had been reading rumors for a couple of weeks that Apple might be doing something with textbooks; and since my school had implemented a 1 to 1 iPad program this year, I was pretty excited that the possibility of our students having their textbooks available in a iPad friendly format sooner than I had expected. I didn’t expect e-textbooks for my subjects to be available now, but the thought of that day moving closer had me pretty pumped.

So, when I got the email from Apple, I downloaded iBooks 2 and iPad U and did a little bit of exploring.  But this post really isn’t about that. It is about what was at the bottom of the email: the almost inconsequential blurb about iBooks Author.  I read the blurb about the program for Macs that lets you publish an iBook and then moved on because I don’t have a Mac. Didn’t really apply to me.

But maybe it could–or should…

Is It Time to Change?

Over the weekend I started thinking about iBooks Author and what it might mean for yearbooks.  This line of thinking is largely due to the fact that as a yearbook adviser in the middle of a push for a major deadline, everything seems to lead back to the yearbook at some point. It also comes from the fact that yearbook advisers spend a lot of time worrying about their yearbook budget and hoping that they will come up with enough money to cover it.

Could iBooks Author offer a viable alternative to the traditional yearbook?  If a school could use this to make the yearbook it might be a way to eliminate all those budget headaches yearbook advisers share every year.  A lot of schools have done away with yearbooks because of the cost associated with them.  I find myself wondering if that day may come for my school; I actually find myself wondering that more and more as the years pass.

We have all read, heard, or seen the effect of ereaders on magazines, newspapers, and bookstores. As more and more publishers move their products to digital formats, I now find myself asking if the traditional, hard copy yearbook should make a jump into the digital realm before it goes the way of the T-Rex.

The idea of basically self-publishing a school yearbook with iBooks Author and having people download it from the iBooks store is pretty enticing.  Yeah, Apple keeps 30%, but I am willing to bet that is drastically better than any rate any school gets from one of the traditional school yearbook companies–even if the school is lucky enough to actually make money from its yearbook.

With the elimination of printing costs (which are the biggest portion of a yearbook’s cost) books that lose money could shift to making money almost immediately. A yearbook budget would be reduced to hardware and software needs.

Of course, all of this would depend on the answer to one question…

Will People Go for It?

Are people open to the idea of buying their yearbook in an ebook format? Or could this be one of those ideas that end up of the list of dead yearbook trends like cd or video supplements? Would people want integrated video, links, slide shows, and other multimedia goodies if it meant giving up the experience of having their best friend sign their yearbook? Even if we decided to do this, should we use iBooks Author or something else?

These are some of the nagging questions I have now. I need to do more research and thinking before I come to any definitive answer.

What do you think?